Alison Clarke: 'Phonemes are sounds AND articulatory gestures' - a must watch/listen for 'the sounds'

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Debbie_Hepplewhite
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Alison Clarke: 'Phonemes are sounds AND articulatory gestures' - a must watch/listen for 'the sounds'

Postby Debbie_Hepplewhite » Sun May 20, 2018 10:41 am

Many thanks to the amazing Alison Clarke - and her niece, Vivien - for this very helpful resource of video clips of hearing - and watching - the sounds (phonemes) being said by Vivien:

https://www.spelfabet.com.au/2018/05/ph ... -gestures/

Phonemes are perceptually distinct speech sounds that distinguish one word from another, e.g. the “p”, “b”, “t” and “d” in “pie”, “by”, “tie” and “die”. They’re also articulatory gestures.

A 2009 article co-authored by reading guru Linnea Ehri says “awareness of articulatory gestures facilitates the activation of graphophonemic connections that helps children identify written words and secure them in memory.” Melbourne Speech Pathologist Helen Botham (Hi, Helen!), lists a number of references on her Cued Articulation website indicating articulatory awareness facilitates phonemic awareness.

I sit right across the table from my clients, so we can see and hear each other’s articulation well. It must be a lot harder to teach a whole class about phonemes, in order to link them to graphemes. Videos on the internet (including my own) about phonemes seem to put them all in one video, making them hard to isolate and repeat on a classroom interactive whiteboard.

I’ve thus filmed my utterly adorable and orthodontically photogenic niece Vivien (thanks, Vivien!) saying each phoneme separately. The 44 videos are below, each with example words which link to the relevant spelling lists on my website.

I hope these are useful in developing kids’ phonemic and articulatory awareness, as well as in teaching adults to say consonant sounds crisply and correctly (without adding a schwa vowel or voicing voiceless consonants) when teaching blending, segmenting and more advanced phonemic awareness.

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